Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Clark Family Wedding and Baptism in Montana

Here are a few of my photos from a family wedding and baptism at my brother-in-law's Montana ranch last week. The ranch sits on the rim of a bench overlooking the Big Hole River near Twin Bridges, Montana.

 Lily and father Ben prior to baptism.

Lily being baptized by her father, Ben Clark, in the Big Hole River.

Sisters Josie, Bridget, and Lily dressed for the wedding.

 Chairs set up for the wedding on the deck of the cabin.

Reverend Jed awaiting the bride and groom.

Flower girls.

The groom and bride after the ceremony.

Chris Clark with his three nieces: Lily and Josie behind Bridget.

 Clark Family: Ben, Chris, Erika, Jed, Steve, Kerstin, and Grandpa David.

Grandmother Stephanie Kovachek.

Josephine (Josie) Clark.

Lily Clark.

Bridget Clark.

Moses Rockwell Crow and Hollyrood Stock Farm



James Wallick, owner of Hollyrood Stock Farm located near Circleville, Orange County, New York, was in financial trouble in 1897. By July of that year, he was desperate enough to auction off all of the furnishings at Hollyrood, including the carpets, bedroom sets, parlor furniture and other effects, some of which had “never been used.” In August of 1897, he and his wife, Mary McInnes Wallick, sold the Hollyrood farm to Elizabeth H. Crow, wife of Moses Rockwell Crow for $22,000. The sale was for 276 acres and included the lands sold to Delphine Stewart by Emma Parmelee as well as the lands sold to George M. Wilkes by Emma’s brother Robert Hill.  At the time of the sale, the Middletown Daily Argus reported that “the mansion of this farm was erected in 1856 and is one of the handsomest in Orange county and is situated in a beautiful plot of ten acres, surrounded by lovely lawns, beautiful evergreen hedges and imported ornamental trees and shrubbery.” The farm was held by the Crow’s for about six years until 1903 when Elizabeth sold the land back to James H. Wallick after the death of her husband. Who were Moses and Elizabeth Crow? And what is their story?

 Hollyrood Stock Farm

Moses Rockwell Crow was born in September of 1853 in Seneca Falls, Seneca County, New York to the Reverend David Crow and Sarah Burlingame Crow. His father was a graduate of Allegheny College, was fluent in twenty-seven languages, and sought out by scholars due to his knowledge of Sanscrit. During Moses youth the family moved from the Town of Benton in Yates County, to the Village of Ovid in Seneca County, then to Elmira in Chemung County, and finally to New York City. According to an article from the New York Herald, Moses started out as a businessman “in a Pennsylvania town, and, failing there, came back to New York City and entered the New York Law School where he graduated at the head of his class.

He apparently did not spend much time practicing law, but went to Mexico as a consultant to Mexican President Diaz on financing and engineering a system of water works for Mexico City. This trip piqued his interest in water delivery systems and, in order to better understand them, he went to Europe and studied the water supply systems there and “while returning to the United States he became acquainted with a man named I. M. Weston, who was a wealthy lumber merchant from Grand Rapids, Mich. Mr. Weston pointed out the advantages of Grand Rapids as a field for water works exploitation. Mr. Crow bought the Grand Rapids Hydraulic Company, converted its spring into a series of huge wells, put in thirty miles of iron mains and built a pump house and huge standpipe.” The New York Herald story continues by saying that:

“The company thrived for a time, until beset by litigation by the city to oust it and by creditors to collect dues, it went into the hands of a receiver named by Mr. Crow, and this receiver still holds it.
“Mr. Crow then bought the old Mount Vernon Water Company. It was not long before he got into legal difficulties with the firm of Coffin & Stanton, who financed the scheme. Mr. Crow fought the then great concern of Coffin & Stanton, that controlled more than fifty water companies, and ultimately drove it into bankruptcy, to the terror of something like twelve hundred country banks, which had loaned money to the firm and had taken water bonds as collateral.

“Mr. Crow resolved to broaden his field of operations. In 1891 he made a contract with the Village of West Chester to supply it with water, and this was followed by contracts with the Village of Wakefield, Williamsbridge, South Mount Vernon, Pelhamville, Pelham Manor, Barton and City Island, the Morris Park race course, the city of New York for Ward’s Island and the government for the military reservation of Fort Schuyler.

“Most of the money to build the necessary works was supplied by Mrs. M. H. Hotchkiss, widow and heiress of the maker of the Hotchkiss gun. She gave Mr. Crow railway bonds in exchange for bonds of his water companies, and Mr. Crow controlled the companies. Instead of using all the money to pay for building the plant he retained, it was said, much of it as contractor. For construction materials he gave notes of his water companies secured by bonds of the concerns he controlled. The New York and Westchester Water Company was first capitalized with $500,000 in stock and $500,000 in bonds. Soon more money was needed and a second mortgage was issued of a half million dollars.





“Later a prior lien mortgage was made to take preference over the other bonds. Of $1,000,000 prior issue of bonds, $200,000 worth were actually sold, and the Court of Appeals at Albany is expected soon to hand down a decision as to whether they are valid or not.

“More money being needed, Crow organized the New York City District Water Supply Company, with $2,000,000 of stock and $2,000,000 of bonds, many of which he disposed of to Mrs. Hotchkiss. This company’s plant consisted of a single main extending from a point across the Bronx from Wakefleld, known as East Yonkers, to Yonkers proper, a pump house and a standpipe. The original company could have built this, but the scheme was concocted to obtain needed finances. Later Mr. Crow organized, for the same reason, the Upper New York City Water Company, capitalized with $1,000,000 stock and $1,000,000 bonds, which ran a main from the Westchester plant up into the Saw Mill River Valley.

“This main the original company could have laid. Then the promoter bought the Pocantico Water Works Company, having a pump house on Pocantico Lake in Sleepy Hollow, North Tarrytown, and connected his system from that point down the Hudson to the Harlem River, thence across the Twenty-third ward to the East River, thence northeast across City Island, thence under Long Island Sound to Hart’s Island, with more than two hundred miles of mains...

“Mr. Crow [who was still single at the time] in 1892 bought the large house at the corner of Eighty-second street and West End avenue and later added the adjoining property to it. Then he began to spend money in lavish entertainments which attracted much attention. He bought the Hotchkiss estate at Great Barrington, Mass., and spent $100,000 to renovate the house and grounds.

“On Christmas week of 1893 he took a party of guests, by special train, to Great Barrington and entertained them for a week at a cost of $50,000. He bought a steam yacht. One summer he rented the largest on the Hudson and leased one of the largest estates on the New Jersey coast at Elberon for the Winter. He took parties on special cars to Florida, and spent money in reckless fashion. Mrs. Hotchkiss became alarmed and refused to advance any more money.” [New York Herald, Sunday, 12 July 1903, p. 3 & 7]

Perhaps due to prodding from Mrs. Hotchkiss, who was unhappy with the party lifestyle of the man in whom she had entrusted so much of her wealth, or perhaps because of the death of his father in August 1892, Moses Crow decided to settle down in 1893. He had met Louise Doelger, probably at one of his lavish parties. She was young, only twenty years old, and apparently quite pretty––pretty enough to catch the eye of the thirty-nine-year-old bachelor Moses. Louise was the daughter of Jacob Doelger, a well-known and wealthy brewer in New York, and his wife Louise Werner Doelger. It is unclear if the Doelger’s approved of the marriage, but it seems likely that they did. Their daughter was marrying a man of some wealth and influence. The couple was married in Manhattan on the 5th of April and moved into Moses’ house on Eighty-second street. The marriage was actually performed twice due to the religious differences between the families.


"The marriage of Miss Doelger to Mr. Crow was celebrated by the Rev. Madison C. Peters in the rectory of the Bloomingdale Reformed Church...[Mr. Crow] is a Protestant and she a Catholic. A second ceremony was performed a week later at the house of the bride’s father by the Rev. Father Taylor, by special dispensation of Archbishop Cerrigan. After the wedding trip they went to live at No. 301 West Eighty-second street, a large brown-stone house fronting on West End avenue. It is furnished luxuriously throughout." [New York World, Friday, 8 September 1893, p. 7 and New York Herald, Friday, 8 September 1893, p. 10]

However happy they might have been on the 5th of April, by June things had turned sour. On the 16th of June, young Louise left the house with her mother, who was visiting her, and never returned. Her husband returned home that evening to find that she was gone. This was a surprise to him, he claimed, because they had never quarreled and she had given him no indication that she was unhappy. This is likely not the complete truth as Louise’s father seems to have become suspicious of how much money Moses really had and was convinced that it was not nearly as much as he had been led to believe. Three months later the newspapers reported that Moses would not return his wife’s expensive wedding gown and other clothes, supposedly worth $3000. She applied through her lawyers in September to retrieve it and also to appoint her father as her guardian, since she was still not of age. Moses replied that he was not stopping her from retrieving the gown, but that he was not going to send it to her; he professed to be still in love with her and, after all, she was still his wife. She did not remain his wife for much longer, however, as the marriage was dissolved by divorce decree in 1894.





Not long after the divorce was finalized, perhaps even on the very day of the decree in 1894, Moses R. Crow married a second time to Miss Elizabeth Davis who was about six months younger than Moses’ first wife Louise. Elizabeth, born in May 1873 in New York, gave Moses two children: David born in November of 1894 in New York and Lucile born in August of 1896 in New Jersey.

Shortly after the birth of his second child, Moses found himself embroiled in a long and difficult trial. He and his benefactress, Mrs. Maria Hotchkiss, had a falling out over financial matters and Moses sued her, and another financier, Mr. Joseph Richardson, in court for $4,000,000 in securities. Maria, formerly Miss Maria Bissell, was known as a shrewd business woman and had inherited a fortune from her husband, Benjamin Berkeley Hotchkiss, who had designed and sold guns. It was apparently not a happy marriage and they drifted apart. Mr. Hotchkiss moved to France where he offered Maria large sums of money if she would divorce him. She refused. He eventually married another woman without the divorce. The second wife was also named Maria (Maria E. Cunningham) and she was unaware that Hotchkiss was still married to his first wife until he died in 1885 in Paris. The courts ruled that the bulk of his estate of several million dollars belonged to his first wife, Maria Bissell Hotchkiss, although the second wife did inherit enough to have a comfortable living.

During the trial, Mrs. Hotchkiss was frequently unable (or unwilling) to remember details and claimed not to even be able to recognize her own signature. Her counsel was none other than Elihu Root, future secretary of war for the United States.

When the trial of the suit against Mrs. Maria H. Hotchkiss before Justice Lawrence in the Supreme Court was adjourned yesterday, she was again beginning to suffer from a partial loss of memory in reply to Lawyer Bien’s questions in rebuttal. Before recess, under Elihu Root’s gentle guidance, her answers were quickly given and to the point. She identified positively a check for $20,000 given by her to Moses R. Crow, the plaintiff, although on direct examination she had failed to recognise it. Mr. Root asked her if Mr. Crow had not disposed of some securities without her consent, and what she said to him.

“I said to him: ‘What right had you to sell or dispose of my securities? “she replied, reading from a notebook.

“And what did he say?”

“I don’t remember.”

“Ah,” remarked Mr. Bien, “you did not put that down in your little book.”

On Friday Mrs. Hotchkiss said that she did not think that she owned any of the Pocantico water works bonds. Yesterday she admitted the ownership of eighty such bonds. Mr. Bien wished to mark for identification a fragment of a letter, and Mr. Root objected.

“Everybody is fragmentary here,” said the Judge, “and no one seems to recollect anything about transactions involving millions.”

Mrs. Hotchkiss became very much mixed up in regard to the details of a deal whereby she acquired a valuable estate in Great Harrington, called Brookside, and just as Mr. Bien was trying to show how that deal was connected with the water works transactions very much to her advantage, the case was adjourned until to-day. [New York World, Tuesday, 2 February 1897]

The trial stretched on from December of 1896 into the next July when the parties eventually decided to drop the lawsuit and come to terms.

The Crows at Hollyrood

It is unclear why Moses and Elizabeth purchased the Hollyrood Farm. Perhaps they wanted it as a summer retreat from New York City or perhaps they were just investing in what they saw as a good property. The purchase came just about the time that the agreement was reached between Moses, Mr. Richardson, and Mrs. Hotchkiss, and so perhaps it was a celebration purchase at having survived the long trial and, by all accounts, having come out of the affair in good shape. Shortly after buying the farm, however, trouble began with their hired help. In August of 1897 one employee, who they had discharged, was found to be “contracting for the purchase of horses” for Mr. Crow, and had “agreed to pay a Bloomingburgh man $600 for a stallion and to have negotiated with other parties there and in Wurtsboro.” The man’s intent was likely to acquire the horses without putting any money down and sell them himself to make money using his former employer’s name to gain the confidence of the sellers.

Again in October of 1897 another employee had to be dismissed and created a stir. The Middletown Argus reported that, “Moses R. Crow, who recently purchased Hollyrood Farm, has had Joseph Lemon, a well known character, on his payroll for some time past. He discharged him last week, and this morning “Joe” met Mr. Crow on the Pine Bush train and proceeded to address him in a very foul and abusive manner. When the train crew threatened to put him off he transferred his abuse to them. Complaint was made in Recorder’s court, and search was made for “Joe” about town. He was not found until 2:20. On being arraigned before Recorder Bradner he pleaded “not guilty.”

The above reports from the local Orange County papers and the 1900 U. S. Census suggest that the Crows did spend time living at Hollyrood Farm. In 1900, they are listed there with their two children, David age 6 years and Lucile age 4 years. Moses also made some improvements to the main dwelling on the farm. In November of 1897 he had the Millspaugh Hardware Company install a central “hot air” heating system.

The Passing of Moses Crow

After their few years at Hollyrood, the good times rapidly came to a close for Moses and Elizabeth. What happened over the next few years is summarized in this report from the New York Herald:

“Mr. Crow built, in 1898, an electric light plant at Dobbs Ferry, where he came in contact with the late J. Jennings McComb. He borrowed money of Mr. McComb, giving the Pocantico Water Works Company as security. During a quarrel he made a savage attack on Mr. McComb,which was overheard by David McComb, a nephew. The young man met Mr. Crow a day or two later, at Fifty-eighth street and Seventh avenue, and struck him down. McComb was arrested, but the case was settled.

“At about this time Mr. Crow got into a quarrel with Adrian Iselin, who owns the New Rochelle water works. Mr. Iselin had laid a main from New Rochelle to Mount Vernon reservoir. Mr. Crow bought the property across the track and about thirty feet below the reservoir he sank wells and built a pump house for the Westchester county company. Naturally, all the water ran out of the Mount Vernon reservoir and there was no redress, as the water percolated through the gravel bed. The Mount Vernon water supply had to be rebuilt at enormous cost. The city of New York still uses their driven wells to supply Westchester.

“At the end of long litigation the three Westchester companies were sold under foreclosure to a reorganization committee for $50,000. The committee recently sold the works to the city for $650,000, a sum about one-flfth of their cost. The Pocantico water works was separately foreclosed by the McCoomb interests and taken from Mr. Crow’s possession.

“Under foreclosure the promotor lost the Hotchkiss estate, his West End avenue house and large interests in Michigan. At Circleville, near Middletown, N. Y., Mr. Crow owned the estate of the late Lester Wallack, actor, of 1,000 acres, on which are many buildings, a private race track and a private railway station of the Erie Railway. This estate was recently taken from Mr. Crow on foreclosure proceedings.

“Mr. Crow’s ambition was to bring water by gravity from the lofty Adirondack lakes to supply New York at a low price to the consumer. He fought the proposed Ramapo scheme as infamous. He bought a newspaper to exploit his views on the water question, but his paper went down with his other interests. He founded a free hospital in West Chester, but it failed because he could not harmonize his allopathic and homoeopathic directors.” [New York Herald, Sunday, 12 July 1903, p. 3 & 7]

In the end, Moses Crow lost most of his money and then his health. In July 1903, at the age of 50 years, Moses developed a problem with his brain, perhaps a type of brain cancer. The New York Herald reported that, “While the diagnosis is not yet completed, it is understood that he has softening of the brain and his friends do not expect him to recover. Mr. Crow, who, in his prime, was a magnificent specimen physically, standing six feet high, is now a physical and mental wreck.” In July of that year he was taken from his home in Chatham, New Jersey to be examined at Bellevue Hospital in New York City where he was found to be mentally insane and transferred to the Manhattan State Hospital at Ward’s Island. The Ward’s Island asylum was opened in 1871 and even though it was perhaps a step up in the care available for the mentally ill, the care was less than adequate with approximately 30 patients for each nurse. However, by the early 1900’s when Moses Crow would have been placed in its care, things had improved.





Manhattan is the largest and one of the best psychiatrical hospitals in the world. It is a hospital in the highest sense. Every patient is treated as a sick person. Many of its patients never in their lives enjoyed such comforts as they now do. The food, clothing and medical treatment are equal to those of the best general hospitals. Each patient is supplied with recreation, occupation and diversion in innumerable forms. Trained nurses and specially selected attendants minister to his smallest needs. His surroundings are bright and cheerful. Pictures, carpets, musical instruments and unlimited reading matter divert and soothe him. His likes and dislikes receive sympathetic consideration. He is nursed and made to feel that he is receiving the care and treatment of a sick man.

Nonetheless, in spite of the quality of the hospital, Moses died on the 9th of August a few weeks after he was institutionalized.

BRIEF GENEALOGICAL SUMMARY –– CROW FAMILY
MOSES ROCKWELL CROW was born in September of 1853 in Seneca Falls, Seneca County, New York to David Crow and Sarah Burlingame. Moses married first on the April 5, 1893, LOUISE DOELGER, the daughter of Jacob Doelger and Louise Werner. They divorced in 1894.  Moses married second shortly after his divorce in 1894 to ELIZABETH H. DAVIS, who was born in May 1873 in New York the daughter of Samuel and Sarah Davis.  Moses died 9 August 1903 in the Manhattan State Hospital at Ward’s Island, New York and was buried in the Steele Cemetery, Falls City, Richardson County, Nebraska near his parents. Elizabeth was living with her parents and daughter Lucy in the Bronx in 1915 and in 1920 and 1930, she was living with her son David and working as a sales lady in a dry goods store.

Moses and Elizabeth had the following children:
    i.    David Rockwell Crow was born 20 November 1894 in Manhattan, New York. After his father died, David moved to Falls City, Nebraska where he lived with his Aunt Hattie Crow Mauger and where he later enlisted in World War I. During the war, David was listed among those who were severely wounded. After the war, David continued his education and became a lawyer for the railroads. In 1920, he is listed in the census in both Falls City, Nebraska and in the Bronx in New York City. He later worked for the London Guarantee & Accident Company. In his World War II draft registration, David was described as five feet, ten and three-quarters inches tall, weighing 142 pounds with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion. This same WWII draft registration card lists Iva Crow as his contact person. Iva was David’s wife, Iva Roberts, who was born 3 January 1899 and died in February 1980. They were living in Queens, New York City in 1940. David died in December 1986 in New York and was buried in the Steele Cemetery in Falls City, Richardson County, Nebraska.
    ii.    Sarah Lucille Elizabeth Crow was born 31 August 1896 at Long Branch, Monmouth County, New Jersey. In 1920, Lucile was living with her mother and brother in the Bronx where she was working as a stenographer.

REFERENCES

 1. The sketch of Moses R. Crow shown here (and incorrectly labeled Moses “F.” Crow) was published in the New York World, Saturday, 5 December 1896, p. 2, a few months before he purchased the Hollyrood Farm.
2. Middletown Argus, 2 July 1897, p. 8 (accessed online at Newspapers.com). 
3. Orange Co. Deeds, Book 431, page 275 (accessed online at FamilySearch.org). 
4. Middletown Daily Argus, Monday, 28 June 1897, p. 8 (accessed online at Newspapers.com). 
5. Orange Co. Deeds, Book 465, page 580-582 (deeds index accessed online at FamilySearch.org). 
6. “United States Census, 1860,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC4F-H49 : accessed 27 July 2015), Rockwell M Crow in household of David Crow, The Village Of Ovid, Seneca, New York, United States; from “1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population,” database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing p. 155, household ID 1196, NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 803,861; “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSL7-GMT : accessed 27 July 2015), Moses R Crow, Wallkill Township (eastern portion excl. Middletown), Orange, New York, United States; citing sheet 12A, family 253, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,142; “New York, Marriages, 1686-1980,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F63T-88Q : accessed 27 July 2015), Moses R. Crow and Louise Doelger, 05 Apr 1893; citing reference ; FHL microfilm 1,452,478. 
7. New York Tribune, Thursday, 11 August 1892, p. 5. 
8. “New York, State Census, 1855,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K6QW-D6P : accessed 27 July 2015), David Crow, E.D. 2, Benton, Yates, New York, United States; count clerk offices, New York; FHL microfilm 838,913. 
9. “United States Census, 1860,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC4F-H49 : accessed 27 July 2015), Rockwell M Crow in household of David Crow, The Village Of Ovid, Seneca, New York, United States; from “1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population,” database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing p. 155, household ID 1196, NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 803,861. 
10. “New York, State Census, 1865,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVNJ-4LL4 : accessed 27 July 2015), David Crow, Ward 05, Elmira, Chemung, New York, United States; citing source p. 43, line 21, household ID 295, State Library, Albany; FHL microfilm 850,932; “United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8X9-GW8 : accessed 27 July 2015), Moses R Crow in household of David Crow, New York, United States; citing p. 63, family 470, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,413. 
11. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZX4-6TT : accessed 27 July 2015), Moses M Crow in household of David Crow, New York, New York, New York, United States; citing enumeration district 643, sheet 631C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0898; FHL microfilm 1,254,898. 
12. New York Herald, Sunday, 12 July 1903, p. 3 & 7; New York Sun, Monday, 13 July 1903, p. 2. Cautionary note concerning the accuracy of the facts in newspaper articles: In these articles, the facts about the Hollyrood Farm are mostly inaccurate. Yes the farm was near Circleville and had been owned by an actor named Wallick; however, when this article was written in the New York Herald in 1903, James H. Wallick was neither dead nor named Lester. In addition, the estate was much less than 1,000 acres and there is no evidence that a private railway station of the Erie Railway was ever part of the farm.
13. New York Tribune, Thursday, 11 August 1892, p. 5.
14. New York World, Friday, 8 September 1893, p. 7 and New York Herald, Friday, 8 September 1893, p. 10.
15. “New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/27BF-XJH : accessed 27 July 2015), Louise Doelger, 24 Oct 1872; citing Birth, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,322,055.
16. “New York, Marriages, 1686-1980,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F63T-88Q : accessed 27 July 2015), Moses R. Crow and Louise Doelger, 05 Apr 1893; citing reference ; FHL microfilm 1,452,478.
17. “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MSL7-GMY : accessed 28 July 2015), Elizabeth H Crow in household of Moses R Crow, Wallkill Township (eastern portion excl. Middletown), Orange, New York, United States; citing sheet 12A, family 253, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,142.
18. New York World, Thursday, 28 January 1897.
19. New York World, Tuesday, 2 February 1897.
20. New York World, Tuesday, 8 December 1896, p. 10 and Sunday, 26 September, 1897, p. 7.
21. Middletown Argus, Saturday, 7 August 1897, p. 4.
22. Middletown Argus, 12 October 1897, p. 4
23. Middletown Argus, 18 November 1897, p. 5.
24. New York Times, Saturday, 19 May 1900, p. 14.
25. Dobbs Ferry Register, New York, 17 July 1903, p. 8.
26. Henry M. Hurd and five others, 1916, The Institutional Care of the Insane in the United States and Canada, volume 3, John Hopkins Press, Baltimore, p. 201-214.
27. “New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/2WXJ-NZG : accessed 28 July 2015), Moses R. Crow, 09 Aug 1903; citing Death, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,323,026.
28. Moses R. Crow in Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
29. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1915; Election District: 58; Assembly District: 34; City: New York; County: Bronx; Page: 20. This New York census shows Elizabeth and her daughter Lucy living with Elizabeth’s parents in the Bronx. An additional grandchild named Evilian (Evelyn) is listed below Lucy with ditto marks and could be assumed to be named “Crow” as well. But her birth would be in about 1891, 3 years before Moses and Elizabeth were married. The ditto marks could also refer to the head of household, who in this case is Samuel Davis.
30. “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJPF-3YR : accessed 7 August 2015), Elizabeth Crow in household of M M Buhrendorf, Bronx Assembly District 8, Bronx, New York, United States; citing sheet 14A, family 283, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,142; “United States Census, 1930,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X766-645 : accessed 7 August 2015), David R Crow in household of Elizabeth H Crow, Bronx (Districts 501-750), Bronx, New York, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 0576, sheet 6B, family 151, line 89, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 1485; FHL microfilm 2,341,220.
31. “New York, Births and Christenings, 1640-1962,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FDYD-2HW : accessed 7 August 2015), David Rockwell Crow, 20 Nov 1894; citing Manhattan, New York, New York, USA, reference ; FHL microfilm 1,322,307; “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MSL7-GMY : accessed 28 July 2015), Elizabeth H Crow in household of Moses R Crow, Wallkill Township (eastern portion excl. Middletown), Orange, New York, United States; citing sheet 12A, family 253, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,142.
32. Richmond Times Dispatch, Richmond, Virginia, Wednesday, 11 December 1918, p. 10; “United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MLH9-7T9 : accessed 9 August 2015), David Crow in household of L C Mauger, Falls City Ward 2, Richardson, Nebraska, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 166, sheet 13B, family 315, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,374,867.
33. “United States Census, 1930,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X766-645 : accessed 7 August 2015), David R Crow in household of Elizabeth H Crow, Bronx (Districts 501-750), Bronx, New York, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 0576, sheet 6B, family 151, line 89, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 1485; FHL microfilm 2,341,220.
34. “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCKY-B22 : accessed 9 August 2015), David Crow, Falls, Richardson, Nebraska, United States; citing sheet 25A, family 172, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,000.
35. “United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F3FB-T38 : accessed 7 August 2015), David R Crow, 1942; citing NAID identifier , NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm.
36. “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JBR8-P57 : accessed 7 August 2015), Iva Crow, Feb 1980; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing); Ancestry.com. Web: Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
37. 1940 US Census, New York City, Queens, New York; Roll: T627_2734; Page: 18A; Enumeration District: 41-663.
38. “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JK5G-327 : accessed 7 August 2015), David Crow, Dec 1986; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).
39. David R. Crow in Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
40. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” , FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FCYW-YMN : accessed 9 August 2015), Sarah L. E. Crow, 31 Aug 1896; citing Long Branch, Monmouth, New Jersey, reference p 42; FHL microfilm 494,236; “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MSL7-GMY : accessed 28 July 2015), Lucile Crow in household of Moses R Crow, Wallkill Township (eastern portion excl. Middletown), Orange, New York, United States; citing sheet 12A, family 253, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,142.

Friday, June 19, 2015

Remembering Fathers

Just a few pictures this week as I think back on my father and on my role as a father to my children. These pictures, mostly taken in about 2002, bring back fond memories on this Father's Day weekend. I had a great father and I have wonderful kids for which I am very grateful.

 Jeff with Grandpa Kowallis

 Melanie dressed for the big dance

 Leanna and Karl at Pearl Harbor

Jeff and Dad (me) at San Francisco market

 Melanie at her internship

 Jeff and Karl at the MTC

 Melanie, Karl, Leanna, and Jeannie at Grandpa's birthday party

 Playing cards with Leanna, Jeff, Mom, Grandma Clark, and Melanie

 Leanna and Karl in Hawaii

Melanie on parade